Connect with us

Covid-19

Screening K-12 Students for Symptoms of COVID-19: Limitations and Considerations

Published

on


Return-to-School Policies

If the student/parent/caregiver answers YES to any question in Section 1 but NO to any questions in Section 2, the student would be excused from school in accordance with existing school illness management policy (e.g., until symptom-free for 24 hours without fever reducing medications).

If the student or parent or caregiver answers YES to any question in Section 1 and YES to any question in Section 2, the student should be referred for evaluation by their healthcare provider and possible testing. CDC strongly encourages local health departments to work with local school systems to develop a strategy to refer symptomatic individuals to an appropriate healthcare provider or testing site. State, Tribal, territorial, and local health officials and/or healthcare providers will determine when viral testing for SARS-CoV-2 is appropriate. Schools should not require testing results as a part of return to school policies. Students who have received a negative test result should be allowed to return to school once their symptoms have otherwise improved in accordance with existing school illness management policies.

Students diagnosed with COVID-19 or who answer YES to any question in Section 1 and YES to any question in Section 2 without negative test results should stay home, isolate themselves from others, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health department. Students and their families should be advised that the local health department may contact the family for contact tracing. If contacted, families should notify the contract tracer that the student attended school.

Students diagnosed with COVID-19 or who answer YES to any component of Section 1 AND YES to any component of Section 2 without negative test results should be permitted to return to school should be in line with current CDC recommendations in “When Can I Be Around Others”. A negative test or doctor’s note should not be required for return. Questions regarding return to school should be jointly decided in consultation with parents or caregivers, school personnel, and the student’s healthcare provider.

Students who are excluded from school should be afforded the opportunity, as soon as feasible when they are well enough to participate in classwork, to make up any missed classwork without penalty in order to reduce mental or physical anxieties about missed academic opportunities.

School Isolation Protocols

Some students may develop symptoms of infectious illness while at school. Schools should take action to isolate students who develop these symptoms from other students and staff.

  • Students with any of the symptoms in Section 1 should follow their school’s current illness management policy to minimize transmission to others, to optimize learning opportunities, and to allow for these symptoms to resolve (at least 24 hours without fever reducing medications or in accordance with existing school illness policy).
  • Students who develop any of the symptoms in Section 1 while at school should be placed in an isolation area separate from staff and other students:
  • Students identified at school who develop any of the symptoms in Section 1 AND answer YES to any of the questions in Section 2 should be placed in an isolation area separate from staff and other students (e.g., a nurse’s office) and then sent home or to a healthcare facility if symptoms indicate a need for further evaluation:
    • If a school needs to call an ambulance or bring a student to the hospital, they should first alert the healthcare staff that the student may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19.
    • After the student is placed in an isolation area, school staff who work in the isolation area should follow CDC’s Considerations for Cleaning and Disinfecting your Building or Facility.
    • Note: In developing plans for placing students with symptoms in an isolation area, schools should be mindful of appropriate safeguards to ensure that students are isolated in a non-threatening manner, within the line of sight of adults, and for very short periods of time.

References

[1] Davies, N.G., Klepac, P., Liu, Y. et al. Age-dependent effects in the transmission and control of COVID-19 epidemics. Nat Med (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0962-9

[2] Assaker, Rita, Anne-Emmanuelle Colas, Florence Julien-Marsollier, Béatrice Bruneau, Lucile Marsac, Bruno Greff, Nathalie Tri, Charlotte Fait, Christopher Brasher, and Souhayl Dahmani. “Presenting symptoms of COVID-19 in children: a meta-analysis of published studies.” BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia (2020). https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0007091220304086?via%3Dihub

[3] Dong, Yuanyuan, Xi Mo, Yabin Hu, Xin Qi, Fan Jiang, Zhongyi Jiang, and Shilu Tong. “Epidemiology of COVID-19 among children in China.” Pediatrics 145, no. 6 (2020). https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/145/6/e20200702

[4] Assaker, Rita, et al. “Presenting symptoms of COVID-19 in children: a meta-analysis of published studies.” BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia (2020).

[5] Goldmann DA. Epidemiology and Prevention of Pediatric Viral Respiratory Infections in Health-Care Institutions. Emerg Infect Dis. 2001;7(2):249-253. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid0702.700249

[6] Roland, Lauren T., Jose G. Gurrola, Patricia A. Loftus, Steven W. Cheung, and Jolie L. Chang. “Smell and taste symptom‐based predictive model for COVID‐19 diagnosis.” In International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology. 2020.

[7] Clemency, Brian M., Renoj Varughese, Danielle K. Scheafer, Brian Ludwig, Jacob V. Welch, Robert F. McCormack, Changxing Ma, Nan Nan, Theresa Giambra, and Thomas Raab. “Symptom Criteria for COVID‐19 Testing of Heath Care Workers.” Academic Emergency Medicine 27, no. 6 (2020): 469-474.

[8] Stokes EK, Zambrano LD, Anderson KN, et al. Coronavirus Disease 2019 Case Surveillance — United States, January 22–May 30, 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2020;69:759–765. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6924e2external iconexternal icon

[9] Assaker, Rita, et al. “Presenting symptoms of COVID-19 in children: a meta-analysis of published studies.” BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia (2020).



Source link

Trending